The Oath: Review

An ancient sin. A long forgotten oath. A town with a deadly secret.

Something evil is at work in Hyde River, an isolated mining town in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest.

Under the cover of darkness, a predator strikes without warning—taking life in the most chilling and savage fashion.

The community of Hyde River watches in terror as residents suddenly vanish. Yet, the more locals are pressed for information, the more they close ranks, sworn to secrecy by their forefathers’ hidden sins.

Only when Hyde River’s secrets are exposed is the true extent of the danger fully revealed. What the town discovers is something far more deadly than anything they’d imagined. Something that doesn’t just stalk its victims, but has the power to turn hearts black with decay as it slowly fills their souls with darkness.

 

Frank Peretti is an absolute legend in Christian literature. He captured everyone’s attention with This Present Darkness and we haven’t stopped reading since. So when I picked up The Oath I had high hopes for a great read, but ultimately put down the book disappointed. Most of this disappointment was due to lack of literary quality (please see my writer’s tirade below for further impassioned details.) But if you’re just looking to go on a good adventure of a book, The Oath is a decent choice. Not great, but not bad either. Because Frank Peretti is a legend for a reason. As a general rule he creates good work. But as far as his track record of books is concerned he has a few high peaks of brilliance and the rest of his books are left lingering in the valleys of decency, this book being one of the latter.

 

Writer Tirade: The book was exciting, don’t get me wrong, but his writing was far from excellent and it drove me crazy! It took him way too long to tell the story and as a result the narrative sagged in multiple places. A tightened narrative would have done wonders and I was incredibly tempted to grab my red pen and start crossing things out that were just unnecessary. And while I know he was trying to draw some deep spiritual parallels in this story, some of them just didn’t logically make any sense. If sin was the dragon then Steve should have been infected with the heart problem even before he committed adultery because he was a sinner then too, so I just didn’t buy the concept of the “sin initiation” as I suppose you could call it. That and other parts of his attempted parabolic story telling were painfully flimsy. And lastly I was amazed at the utter blandness of his writing style. He had no distinct voice, no interesting personality that pulled me in with his technique. Everything was so average with this book it was downright remarkable! Ok, tirade done. Thanks for hanging in there with me!

 

Book 773 of 1,000!

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